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Posts tagged we live in the future.
+ We Live In The Future
Nothing could prepare me to discover Vaudeville, the 12-foot fully functioning mech. Weighing in at a whopping 4,500 kilograms, Vaudeville is a walking dream come true. Powered by Kinect integration, the bot is controlled through a cockpit where you (yes, you) can get in and control it. It can also be accessed remotely by connecting your cell phone to a miniature version of the robot and manipulating it by hand.
It gets even better, friends. You can buy one. Or rather, you’ll be able to do so later this year, when Vaudeville goes up for sale online. If you do decide to take that plunge, the heroes at Suidobashi Heavy Industry allow optional customizations for your mech, including a fire-fighting water gun and full-body camouflage.
There are more glorious shots of Vaudeville here. Enjoy the gallery while I contemplate how many of my limbs I have to sell in order to afford one.

We Live In The Future

Nothing could prepare me to discover Vaudeville, the 12-foot fully functioning mech. Weighing in at a whopping 4,500 kilograms, Vaudeville is a walking dream come true. Powered by Kinect integration, the bot is controlled through a cockpit where you (yes, you) can get in and control it. It can also be accessed remotely by connecting your cell phone to a miniature version of the robot and manipulating it by hand.

It gets even better, friends. You can buy one. Or rather, you’ll be able to do so later this year, when Vaudeville goes up for sale online. If you do decide to take that plunge, the heroes at Suidobashi Heavy Industry allow optional customizations for your mech, including a fire-fighting water gun and full-body camouflage.

There are more glorious shots of Vaudeville here. Enjoy the gallery while I contemplate how many of my limbs I have to sell in order to afford one.

+ We Live In The Future
Holograms are a definitive staple of science fiction culture, but researchers from the Human Media Lab at Queen’s University in Ontario are working to make them a reality. Friends, say hello to the TeleHuman.
The Telehuman is a life-size cylindrical video chat pod where users can communicate with three-dimensional displays that are capable of 360-degree representation. The technology is not necessarily holographic, though it appears much in the same fashion. The Telehuman uses ten Microsoft Kinect sensors to project your image onto a convex mirror which is then reflected onto a wrap-around acrylic screen. Go ahead and pinch yourself.
Only downside? It takes two of these bad boys to really work, and each Telehuman runs about $5000. On top of that, you’ll need to wear special glasses to view the images, even though the shades make the images noticeably dimmer. Still, with the rapid advancement of current technology, I’m sure it won’t be long before we see these things cropping up with a lower price tag in the very near future.
Watch a video of the Telehuman in action here.

We Live In The Future

Holograms are a definitive staple of science fiction culture, but researchers from the Human Media Lab at Queen’s University in Ontario are working to make them a reality. Friends, say hello to the TeleHuman.

The Telehuman is a life-size cylindrical video chat pod where users can communicate with three-dimensional displays that are capable of 360-degree representation. The technology is not necessarily holographic, though it appears much in the same fashion. The Telehuman uses ten Microsoft Kinect sensors to project your image onto a convex mirror which is then reflected onto a wrap-around acrylic screen. Go ahead and pinch yourself.

Only downside? It takes two of these bad boys to really work, and each Telehuman runs about $5000. On top of that, you’ll need to wear special glasses to view the images, even though the shades make the images noticeably dimmer. Still, with the rapid advancement of current technology, I’m sure it won’t be long before we see these things cropping up with a lower price tag in the very near future.

Watch a video of the Telehuman in action here.

+ We Live In The Future
Just in time to celebrate Star Wars Day, the masterminds at Wicked Lasers have brought us some of the most realistic light sabers (or “lasersabers”) the world has ever seen. The best part? They actually work. But how?

LaserSabers are energized by the light of Wicked Lasers, harnessing the power of the force. The LaserSaber features an ultra smooth magnetic gravity system that can “power up” and “power down” the blade.
The LaserSaber maintains its radiant brilliance even when the lights are on. The LaserSaber is interchangeable and will attach to any Spyder 3 model. The aircraft grade aluminum hilt ensures secure attachment of the blade. Due to the extreme powers of the Spyder 3, only operate while wearing LaserShades in a controlled environment.

The sabers start at about a hundred dollars, but between the various color and laser customizations you can make, the bill ends up being somewhere close to a cool four hundred. They also come with a pair of LaserShades, which are to be worn at all times when operating a saber, due to the very real danger that they present.
Of course, we’re still parsecs away from having light sabers that dually function as both accessory and weapon, but that doesn’t take away from how much I desperately need to own one. If you’ve got some extra cash and a desire to burn through it in the nerdiest way possible, head on over to Wicked Lasers and throw your money at a lasersaber. You won’t regret it, but your significant other might.

We Live In The Future

Just in time to celebrate Star Wars Day, the masterminds at Wicked Lasers have brought us some of the most realistic light sabers (or “lasersabers”) the world has ever seen. The best part? They actually work. But how?

LaserSabers are energized by the light of Wicked Lasers, harnessing the power of the force. The LaserSaber features an ultra smooth magnetic gravity system that can “power up” and “power down” the blade.

The LaserSaber maintains its radiant brilliance even when the lights are on. The LaserSaber is interchangeable and will attach to any Spyder 3 model. The aircraft grade aluminum hilt ensures secure attachment of the blade. Due to the extreme powers of the Spyder 3, only operate while wearing LaserShades in a controlled environment.

The sabers start at about a hundred dollars, but between the various color and laser customizations you can make, the bill ends up being somewhere close to a cool four hundred. They also come with a pair of LaserShades, which are to be worn at all times when operating a saber, due to the very real danger that they present.

Of course, we’re still parsecs away from having light sabers that dually function as both accessory and weapon, but that doesn’t take away from how much I desperately need to own one. If you’ve got some extra cash and a desire to burn through it in the nerdiest way possible, head on over to Wicked Lasers and throw your money at a lasersaber. You won’t regret it, but your significant other might.

We Live In The Future

Let’s be honest: at some point, we’ve each wanted to live in a sprawling futuristic landscape, flying cars and all. It’s the future we were promised, but is it really the future we need? Engineers at Living PlanIT are one step closer to answering that question with their fully sentient city, PlanIT Valley, a fully sentient, self-sustained city capable of being run without human interaction.

Well, what does it mean to have a city sustained on minimal human intervention, exactly? Over 100 million sensors throughout PlanIT Valley will record data and relay it all to an Urban Operating System (UOS), in the most Orwellian fashion you can imagine. The UOS commands the entire city and presides over traffic, emergency dispatch, surveillance, and communications.

Leaky faucet? The UOS can detect it, and if it can’t do the repair remotely, will dispatch a plumber. Lose your child? Surveillance cameras might be swiveled to ascertain “the child’s current location and activity.” Apartment on fire? The UOS will alert the fire department, direct each resident to the safest exit, adjust the neighborhood’s traffic lights to clear a path for the incoming trucks, tell the firefighters which parts of the building are affected and the locations of anyone inside, automatically unlock doors and windows, increase pressure in that neighborhood’s water mains, and allocate patients in priority order when they arrive at the nearest hospital.
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This almost omnipotent city, capable of sustaining 225,000 civilians, is currently under production by creator Steve Lewis, who projects that we’ll be seeing greener technocities on a much larger scale by 2050. PlanIt Valley, in addition to functioning as a living laboratory, was designed entirely with energy conservation in mind, down to being able to remotely navigate cars into empty parking spaces and control air conditioning in empty rooms when they’re unoccupied. The city is, essentially, designed to be perfect.

Part of me is impressed, I will admit. After reading more about it and seeing some of the concept art, my interest was definitely solidified. On the other hand, I am also thoroughly frightened. I’ve read The Veldt, so I know how all this ends. But if genuine cities of the future are going to become the norm, I sincerely hope we can perfect them by the time I can afford to live in one.

+ We Live In The Future
There comes a time in every man’s life when you just have to say “fuck it” and build a fully functioning Star Trek phaser. One man did, and the results are downright awesome.
The video seen above is causing quite a stir around the internet, with techies furiously debating over legitimacy, casing and laser specifications, while Trekkies alternate between weeping silent tears of joy and angrily shouting that the laser should be red.
The exact specifications of the device are unknown, much like the video’s origin. No one is certain whether it has been doctored, but either way you have to give the guy credit for his ingenuity and flair. Hell, if I had the capacity to build one of these, I would probably just spend hours annoying my cat with it. Kudos to someone using this to do something slightly more productive, even if it’s only popping a few balloons.
[source][image source]

We Live In The Future

There comes a time in every man’s life when you just have to say “fuck it” and build a fully functioning Star Trek phaser. One man did, and the results are downright awesome.

The video seen above is causing quite a stir around the internet, with techies furiously debating over legitimacy, casing and laser specifications, while Trekkies alternate between weeping silent tears of joy and angrily shouting that the laser should be red.

The exact specifications of the device are unknown, much like the video’s origin. No one is certain whether it has been doctored, but either way you have to give the guy credit for his ingenuity and flair. Hell, if I had the capacity to build one of these, I would probably just spend hours annoying my cat with it. Kudos to someone using this to do something slightly more productive, even if it’s only popping a few balloons.

[source]
[image source]

+ We Live In The Future
Bottoms up, cadets. Earlier this month, the International Space Station confirmed that they will be testing the effects of gravity on the maturation of malt whiskey. You heard that right, folks: space booze.
Compounds of unmatured malt from the Ardbeg distillery, as well as particles of charred oak, were sent up in an unmanned cargo ship last October. Scientists hope to study the effects of near-zero gravity on the maturation process, in addition to exploring the benefits in flavor that the lack of gravity may present.
This research has the potential to open up quite a few doors regarding the future of alcohol production, but mostly we’re just crossing our fingers and hoping their next experiment involves Romulan ale.
[source]

We Live In The Future

Bottoms up, cadets. Earlier this month, the International Space Station confirmed that they will be testing the effects of gravity on the maturation of malt whiskey. You heard that right, folks: space booze.

Compounds of unmatured malt from the Ardbeg distillery, as well as particles of charred oak, were sent up in an unmanned cargo ship last October. Scientists hope to study the effects of near-zero gravity on the maturation process, in addition to exploring the benefits in flavor that the lack of gravity may present.

This research has the potential to open up quite a few doors regarding the future of alcohol production, but mostly we’re just crossing our fingers and hoping their next experiment involves Romulan ale.

[source]

+ We Live In The Future
In what is probably the strangest news I have heard all week, researchers from Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand predict that we could see synthetic prostitutes as soon as 2050.
Futurist Ian Yeoman and sexologist Michelle Mars penned a paper entitled Robots, Men, and Sex Tourism in which they highlight the possibility of robot sex clubs and red-light districts laden with androids. The two researchers stress that the greatest benefit of robotic sex workers is their ability to completely eliminate all “human fluids”, which significantly reduces the risk of sexually transmitted diseases.
Now, I think there are much better ways to spend $9,500, but the idea of almost entirely eliminating the danger and, additionally, the emotion from sex intrigues me - would these truly gain popularity? Most of us are already treat our cellphones and computers like third limbs, and with the added trend of isolation only increasing in breadth, making the leap to physical bounds could revolutionize how our culture views sex and the sex industry entirely. If the research is correct, it won’t be long before we find out.
[image source][source]

We Live In The Future

In what is probably the strangest news I have heard all week, researchers from Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand predict that we could see synthetic prostitutes as soon as 2050.

Futurist Ian Yeoman and sexologist Michelle Mars penned a paper entitled Robots, Men, and Sex Tourism in which they highlight the possibility of robot sex clubs and red-light districts laden with androids. The two researchers stress that the greatest benefit of robotic sex workers is their ability to completely eliminate all “human fluids”, which significantly reduces the risk of sexually transmitted diseases.

Now, I think there are much better ways to spend $9,500, but the idea of almost entirely eliminating the danger and, additionally, the emotion from sex intrigues me - would these truly gain popularity? Most of us are already treat our cellphones and computers like third limbs, and with the added trend of isolation only increasing in breadth, making the leap to physical bounds could revolutionize how our culture views sex and the sex industry entirely. If the research is correct, it won’t be long before we find out.

[image source]
[source]

+ We Live In The Future
A team of physicists at the University of Dundee have created a real-life sonic screwdriver - yes, I’m serious.
The Doctor’s trusty tool was replicated using ultrasound energy capable of manipulating an object away from itself and, using a component of momentum which exerts torque on the object, a helix-shaped vortex beam then causes the item to rotate.
Researchers hope to use this breakthrough in ultrasound technology for future endeavors regarding non-invasive surgery, but we’re just hoping they figured out how to make it work on wood.
Click here to see a video of the device in action.
[image source] [source]

We Live In The Future

A team of physicists at the University of Dundee have created a real-life sonic screwdriver - yes, I’m serious.

The Doctor’s trusty tool was replicated using ultrasound energy capable of manipulating an object away from itself and, using a component of momentum which exerts torque on the object, a helix-shaped vortex beam then causes the item to rotate.

Researchers hope to use this breakthrough in ultrasound technology for future endeavors regarding non-invasive surgery, but we’re just hoping they figured out how to make it work on wood.

Click here to see a video of the device in action.

[image source]
[source]

+ We Live In The Future
Great news! This blog now hosts a small feature called We Live In The Future. I will be posting small blurbs about developments in the world of technology and science, in hopes of highlighting just how awesome our future truly is.
This week’s edition features a scene straight out of a science fiction novel. Planetary Resources, a space exploration company, hopes to unveil a new project next week that aims to “create a new industry and a new definition of ‘natural resources.’” Several big names have been attached to this project already, including famed director James Cameron, two Google executives, astronaut Tom Jones, and Peter Diamandis.
In a conference call slated for next Tuesday, the company hopes to dispatch “two critical sectors” of information to the public concerning “natural resources and space exploration”. The smart money is on asteroid mining, sources say, but we’ll know for certain what Planetary Resources has in store early next week.
[image credit][source]

We Live In The Future

Great news! This blog now hosts a small feature called We Live In The Future. I will be posting small blurbs about developments in the world of technology and science, in hopes of highlighting just how awesome our future truly is.

This week’s edition features a scene straight out of a science fiction novel. Planetary Resources, a space exploration company, hopes to unveil a new project next week that aims to “create a new industry and a new definition of ‘natural resources.’” Several big names have been attached to this project already, including famed director James Cameron, two Google executives, astronaut Tom Jones, and Peter Diamandis.

In a conference call slated for next Tuesday, the company hopes to dispatch “two critical sectors” of information to the public concerning “natural resources and space exploration”. The smart money is on asteroid mining, sources say, but we’ll know for certain what Planetary Resources has in store early next week.

[image credit]
[source]